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Soft drinks industry soars in value

Soft drinks industry soars in value

The soft drinks industry in the UK has received a significant boost after new figures noted a rise in value over the past year.

A report published by the British Soft Drinks Association (BSDA) on May 8th revealed that the sector had experienced a 3.3 per cent rise in value to just under £15 billion during the course of 2012. This was despite overall volumes decreasing 2.5 per cent to 14.2 billion litres, the equivalent of 227 litres per person. The 'Refreshing the nation' research showed differing performances from various sectors within the soft drinks market.

While the overall retail value had grown during the past year, there was mixed performances for the individual products. Bottled water and energy drinks saw their volumes grow by 3.3 per cent and 9.7 per cent respectively, but the likes of carbonates, dilutables, fruit juice, sports drinks and still and juice drinks marked declines during the same timeframe. No added sugar products continued to dominate, with these drinks accounting for 61 per cent of the market, while added sugar took up the remaining 39 per cent.

Gavin Partington, BSDA director general, said: “It’s been a tough year for the economy, but the soft drinks industry has come through it well. Keeping in touch with people’s tastes is central to the industry’s success, as the prominent role of drinks without added sugar shows.”

There is the common conception that obese and overweight people tend to consume more soft drinks but this was disproved in the report. Officials behind the figures stated that the results showed that soft drinks were not the cause of weight problems.

Coca-Cola recently launched an anti-obesity initiative in the UK designed to make people choose more healthy options when having their lunch or dinner. The television adverts, aired on ITV and Channel 4 during March, were part of the company's Responsibility Deal commitments and promoted a range of products that were much healthier than consuming junk food and snacks on a regular basis.

 

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