Job Search
Keywords

Job type
Location
Minimum Salary
Maximum Salary

Salt cuts ‘have saved lives’

Salt cuts ‘have saved lives’

Food manufacturers' decision to cut back on salt has had a significant positive impact on the nation's health.
 
That is according to a study published in the British Medical Journal by researchers at Queen Mary, University of London.
 
The paper showed that there is a connection between a 15 per cent decrease in people's average salt consumption per day (between 2003 and 2011) and a 40 per cent drop in deaths from coronary heart disease.
 
Businesses working in the food industry made the decision to reduce the amount of salt in their products following a campaign by the Food Standards Agency (FSA).  
 
Since the government strategy was introduced, there is roughly 30 per cent less salt in bread and 50 per cent less in cereals, a fact which has also played a role in there being 42 per cent fewer fatalities from strokes.
 
Professor Graham MacGregor, co-author of the study, said in an interview with the Independent that it was "absolutely clear" a reduction in salt had helped cut death rates.
 
He suggested the decision to cut the white stuff from people's diets has resulted in 18,000 lives being saved.
 
"We have absolutely no nutritional need to eat salt … [it] directly puts up your blood pressure [and] it is a major cause of death through that."
 
Despite the reduction in salt in products including biscuits, crisps and pasta sauces, the nation still has some way to go before it is consuming the recommended six grams per day.
 
On average, Britons are consuming 8.1 to 8.8 grams a day, so there is clearly more work to be done before the FSA targets are met and all food manufacturers are on board. 
 
According to the organisation World Action on Salt and Health, the majority of salt that consumers eat is found in pre-prepared dishes. It states that despite the fact the mineral occurs naturally at low levels in most of the things people eat, the vast majority (80 per cent) of our salt intake comes from processed food. 

 

© Quantica Search and Selection 2013