Job Search
Keywords

Job type
Location
Minimum Salary
Maximum Salary

Floods are putting UK food production in danger

Floods are putting UK food production in danger

The floods that are currently wreaking havoc across the UK have caused extensive damage to rural areas, meaning some of the country's food production has been put in danger.

Both crops and farm animals have been affected by the flooding, which means the production of meat, milk, wheat and vegetables can not be carried out to an acceptable standard in some areas.

As the severity of the flooding was unexpected, those working in the agricultural sector are concerned that it could be a sign of things to come and that the UK's food security may face long-term threats.

The government is being called on to improve conditions and address climate change issues as farm workers feel that it has not done enough to protect agricultural land in the past.

Neil Sinden from the Campaign to Protect Rural England said: "We need a response from the government that recognises the importance for our long-term food security of safeguarding high-quality farmland. We need to view the countryside as more than a place for building and value it for the food it provides."

Chairman of the National Farmers Union Peter Kendall also commented on the crisis, saying that the current floods should act as wake-up call for those who do not see the importance of UK food production. 

He stated that 58 per cent of agricultural land with the highest production levels  in England is located on floodplains, so something needs to be done to safeguard the land so as not to cause further damage and disruption to the industry.

It has been estimated by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs that during the 2020s, 35,000 hectares of productive agricultural land will experience severe flooding at least once every three years. However, it is believed that if the government does not act soon, by the 2080s this could increase to 130,000 affected hectares, which would have a serious impact on the country's ability to produce food of an acceptable quality.

 

© Quantica Search and Selection 2013