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Fast food brands to sign litter pledge

Fast food brands to sign litter pledge

Some of the UK's most popular fast food brands are set to sign a pledge that will outline their commitment to cut down on high litter volumes.

McDonald's, KFC and Domino's Pizza are among the brands supporting the Keep Britain Tidy campaign by signing up to the litter prevention commitment, the Independent reports.

Alongside the fast food chains, Coca-Cola and chewing gum manufacturer Wrigley are also taking part in the project.

The campaign is to be formally announced in the House of Commons at a meeting of the Tidy Britain All Party Parliamentary Group today (Thursday May 15th).

It will be launched in an effort to cut down on high volumes of rubbish on the streets, as well as the amount restaurants throw out, which can then cost authorities billions of pounds to dispose of.

A spokesperson from KFC commented: "We recognise the impact of litter on local communities and acknowledge that we have a clear responsibility to minimise litter in and around our restaurants.

"We're delighted to sign the new commitment, which is focused on litter prevention, and to help with this we'll engage in more local partnerships with councils and other businesses to not just manage litter, but to also raise awareness around responsible behaviours."

Keep Britain Tidy's communications manager Helen Bingham added the government needs to increase its focus on litter prevention, as in recent years, the issue has primarily been left to local authorities to deal with, which she said has "squeezed budgets", possibly impacting on other services.

After signing the pledge, brands will have to begin addressing their attitudes towards rubbish a little differently as part of the promise. 

For example, they will need to include clear guidelines regarding the subject in their environmental and corporate social responsibility policies, as well as thinking about changing the design of products and packaging to encourage consumers not to litter.

Ms Bingham adds customers need encouraging "to do the right thing" with regard to rubbish to solve the £1 billion litter problem, which could potentially have a positive impact on the economy in the future.

 

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