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Energy drinks manufacturer urged to react to ‘negative publicity’

Energy drinks manufacturer urged to react to ‘negative publicity’

Energy drinks manufacturers need to react appropriately to negative publicity, according a leading analyst.

The consumption of energy drinks in the UK has reached record levels in recent years with research from Canadean showing that one in ten Brits purchasing them in the past 12 months alone. While they are designed to give people a caffeine boost through a busy day or night, the products are regularly the subject of bad publicity.

Canadean found that six out of ten of all respondents who drank energy drinks on a regular basis thought they were bad for their health with a further 72 per cent even suggesting some form restriction on the sale of the products to children, FoodManufacture.co.uk reports. Negative press is something which the energy drinks industry needs to tackle.

Speaking to the news provider, Thomas Delaney, an analyst at Canadean, said: "More and more consumers exchange reviews and opinions about food and drinks ingredients online and are able to look up dubious additives and e-numbers quickly.

"This means that manufacturers need to become more transparent regarding their ingredients and react to negative news online."

Mr Delaney highlighted the adoption of taurine-free ingredients, something which a number of energy drink manufacturers have already began doing. This move helps to combat the negative publicity surrounding amino sulphonic acids, which are commonly used in the industry.

The energy drinks sector is big business with a recent report by Mintel highlighting it has grown from £1 billion in 2009 to £1.5 billion in 2014. An estimated 550 million litres of energy drink had been sold during this period, up from the 454 million litres recorded in 2011.

One of the key factors behind this surge in volumes was fatigue. Mintel noted that many respondents to the UK-based survey was that a large proportion said they felt tired on a regular basis.

 

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